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Iconic Avant-Garde Icelandic Kween, Björk, Gets Positive Reviews For Her Final "Biophilia" Show

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Collected reviews of Björk's final "Biophilia" show held at the Alexandra Palace in London, England.
Financial Times : It was absorbing and occasionally compelling, a powerful blend of the digital and the organic. This was the show’s final performance and it was being filmed for later release (perhaps by then it will be streamed directly into people’s brains), which made it necessary for three songs to have retakes: irksome. But all was forgiven at the end when Björk said something I doubt I will ever hear again from a performer on stage: “This one’s for the Faroe Islands and Greenland – come on!” Then everyone went bonkers to the exhilarating throw-off-the-shackles-of-Danish-tyranny beat of “Declare Independence”.


The Guardian : When Björk appears, she doesn't look much older than the fresh-faced teens, despite being 48. What sets her apart – aside from the huge, pastel-hued afro wig and a dress that looks like a lumpy pupa – is her boundless capacity to perform. Bouncing on her heels, her voice picks up on each twinkling tremor of "Moon" and every shuddering beat within "Crystalline", her hands moving and head twitching in sync.


musicOMH : The stage looks harmonious and a little alien, if not quite symmetrical. Rather like Björk herself, whose alternately jagged and cooing vocals work well with these concepts, her characteristic growls and howls punctuating and persuading on sweet melodies that are rarely straightforward yet often have the quality of lullabies... It’s a reminder that, for all the grand nature concepts and created instruments, ultimately Björk remains the inimitable star shining brightly at the heart of her own system.


Mixmag : But for all its boundary pushing bravado, "Biophilia" proved itself to be one of Björk's most accessible and rewarding albums for years, now largely viewed by fans as a mid-career best... With many of the songs made up almost solely of chimes and voices, Björk's voice and faultless delivery is really allowed to shine and you're reminded that for all her inventiveness over the last 20 years, it's the uniqueness of that voice that has really carried her.


The Telegraph :  Björk’s vocal performance was faultless: the textured leaps and growls she is known for were captivating. With the choir’s aid, some of Biophilia’s tracks stood up well against her earlier crowd-pleasers. The joyously dubby breakdown of "Crystalline" marked it as a worthy successor to 1995 belter "Army Of Me". The thought-provoking love song "Virus" was as sensational as "Sonnets/Unrealities", whose unaccompanied e.e. cummings lyrics were heartbreakingly tender. But the show was most endearing when the tectonic plates of Björk’s performance cracked. The gig was being filmed, and the repetition of some songs elicited bashful explanation from the usually succinct singer and a loving cheer from the crowd.


The Independent : On the top of a hill, far, far into north London, sits Alexandra Palace. Built as a temple to public education and entertainment, it became the first BBC Television headquarters. It's the perfect venue for Björk’s last live performance of"Biophilia", the 2011 album at the centre of a ground-breaking multimedia concept of apps, installations and live performances... In a venue that was home to one of the last century’s greatest technological advancements, with the colossal TV mast on the roof to prove it, Björk taps away on a small black screen that has changed the world comparably. Having toured with "Biophilia" for two years, you get a sense of the breakneck pace of current change: in ways, the iPad has already been superseded. All the same, the performance is awe-inspiring in its ambition and execution, and leaving the venue, the city below looks somehow different, like a rain sodden cobweb, a distant galaxy or the mulch on the forest floor, perhaps. If you judge music on its ability to change our view of the world, there’s surely no greater compliment.


Evening Standard : “We’re a bit mushy and emotional,” said the singer from beneath a huge candyfloss wig and a dress made of sparkles and bumps. The mushy ones included herself, the 18-strong female Icelandic choir Graduale Nobili, iPad-wielding musical director Matt Robertson and percussionist Manu Delagu but presumably not David Attenborough, whose familiar tones appeared as recordings to introduce each song... Most wondrous was a Tesla coil in a cage, sparking real lightning and rasping electric sounds during "Thunderbolt" and old favourite "Possibly Maybe". “Electric shocks, I love them,” she sang in the latter. So did the rest of us.




SOURCES ( UN ) ( DEUX ) ( TROIS ) ( QUATRE ) ( CINQ ) ( SIX ) et ( SEPT )


Finally! Now this flaw-free Icelandic kween can get to work on her next epic and trendsetting album which will come to slay all the music lessers after four/five years! Bless! <3



What do you think Björk will do next for her ninth album, ONTD?

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